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5 Tips on Digital Note-Taking

1. Create a Log to capture your progress

Have you ever forgotten something important about a project? Write it down in a log and put updates about your project in there. You will never forget something important again.

For example:

2019/01/27

  • Wrote an article about digital note-taking
  • Found some helpful examples
  • Made a silly meta-joke

2. Link Pages for Reference

(This might only work in OneNote.) Wouldn’t it be great to create your own little Wikipedia for your projects and notes? Well, if you link certain words within a page to another page in another notebook, you can easily re-create this experience in OneNote yourself. This will solve the struggle of searching for something, since you cross-reference to it anyway.

3. Keep It Simple!

If you take notes in lectures, you might end up with a wall of text that is discouraging to read. Keep it simple. Just write down the essentials and try to focus more on the lecturer itself. As long as you understand your notes (only YOU have to), you’re fine.

4. Create Sources-lists

Sometimes you find something interesting on the internet which might even be related to your studies. Put a link to these sources in a single page. It will save you a lot of time, especially if you have to write a paper.

5. Don’t Waste Time on Fancy Designs

You want to write down stuff, not win a designer competition. Just write those thoughts down. You’ll likely write summaries, flash cards or create other forms of learning material anyway. In the end, it doesn’t even matter *sings along Linkin Park song* *feels embarrased to use an asterisk within an article*

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